Friday, June 30, 2017

POCHI TAMBA NSOH: The African Woman is strong but needs to believe more in herself.


Who is Pochi TAMBA NSOH?
 
That is not an easy question. Friends call me Porsche, like the car but I am Pochi Tamba Nsoh. Passionate about making our society and world a live-able place with origins from Bambalang, a village in Ndop Sub-Division in the Ngoketunjia Division of the North West Region of Cameroon, I am a journalist. I have always wished to be a remarkable journalist, so I chip in my little bits daily to add value to lives in my Country. I also write and I am very involved in civil society activities that bring forth the rights and issues of people on the margin of society, such as the less privileged.


What drives Pochi?
  
I love giving and receiving smiles. I am very inquisitive and I enjoy being part of things happening around me. I am fueled by the love for humanity to keep lost values alive?.

What is your greatest influence?

I would not know that for sure. But let me rather share with you two things I do which have given a lot of depth and definition to my life, and for which I am proud. Since 2007, I have been working to keep some vulnerable children from dropping out of school by providing fees and other needs. Today, we can count over 60 of such. I have also been part of varied initiatives to sensitize communities on different social issues like rape, sex education, Family challenges, etc. I have no idea how much these actions have been, but I am definitely proud of myself each time I am able to add one step to this particular civil society advocacy journey. 

Also, in 2007, I started the Network of African Youths for Development (www.nayd.org) . 
It is today one of the greatest online meeting places (with thousands of youths and NGOs across over 40 countries as members) of African youths around the globe who believe in what they are doing and are working hard for a better tomorrow

Who are your top three role models? 

My models vary and change as the case may be. I greatly admire people who beat challenges or who are not afraid to go against the waves. I am a huge fan of Mother Teresa of Calcutta who left her people and her continent to go serve the poor in land that had nothing in common with hers, Christian Cardinal Tumi who till date is the simplest and most straightforward person I have ever met and  Whitney Houston whom God blessed with a voice that none has, and an inspiration that is rare to find.

Where do you see yourself in the next 5 years?

Still working hard as a journalist, and stealing some time off that passion to go do other things that my heart runs after. More time with communities and much more with family.
What are the challenges faced by African Women?

A decade + ago, African women had reasons to expect change following a much-heralded global conference that set ambitious targets to transform the lives of women across the world. This year marks the 22nd anniversary of that milestone event, the Fourth World Conference on Women, held in Beijing, China, in 1995, but like their counterparts elsewhere, African women are taking stock of progress and asking to what extent promised reforms have been implemented. They are also examining why progress has been limited in many countries and are seeking ways to overcome the obstacles.

In Africa specifically, women have made significant strides in the political arena over the past few years. The continental political body, the African Union (AU), took a major step by promoting gender parity in its top decision-making positions. In 2003 five women and five men were elected as AU commissioners. The following year, Ms. Gertrude Mongella was chosen to head the AU’s Pan-African Parliament, where women make up 25 per cent of members.
In Africa specifically, women have made significant strides in the political arena over the past few years. The continental political body, the African Union (AU), took a major step by promoting gender parity in its top decision-making positions. In 2003 five women and five men were elected as AU commissioners. The following year, Ms. Gertrude Mongella was chosen to head the AU’s Pan-African Parliament, where women make up 25 per cent of members.
In Africa specifically, women have made significant strides in the political arena over the past few years. The continental political body, the African Union (AU), took a major step by promoting gender parity in its top decision-making positions. In 2003 five women and five men were elected as AU commissioners. The following year, Ms. Gertrude Mongella was chosen to head the AU’s Pan-African Parliament, where women make up 25 per cent of members.
In Africa specifically, women have made significant strides in the political arena over the past few years. The continental political body, the African Union (AU), took a major step by promoting gender parity in its top decision-making positions. In 2003 five women and five men were elected as AU commissioners. The following year, Ms. Gertrude Mongella was chosen to head the AU’s Pan-African Parliament, where women make up 25 per cent of members.
The African Woman has made a number of signs of improvement in the last 3 decades Amy, but she is neither being heard nor understood, talk less of her being accepted as a different piece of beauty.
It is true some UN Special Advisers on Gender Issues and Advancement of Women  have been making moves to implement the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW), a UN protocol, as well as the development of new policies and guidelines and creation of networks of gender experts, but a lot more is needed as the African woman continues to face not only widespread poverty, she also bears heavy labour burdens.
African women continue to face not only widespread poverty, but also heavy labour burdens.

 
What does Pochi do to relax herself?

I sing and listen to music. I also dance. I swim and I take long walks.

What is your ICE vision? 

I guess this is where I tell you that I inspired by anything that breaks a barrier and charts a new way forward. I celebrate such brains and I am of course empowered by that experience.

Any Plans for the African Union? 

It is true that many African women are still denied education and employment, and still have limited opportunities in trade, industry and government, but I have no plans yet for the AU.
We are all aware that despite achievements and progress made, African women face major challenges and obstacles,” says Dr. Farkhonda Hassan, chair of the UN Economic Commission for Africa’s Committee on Women and Development. For example, she says, the primary development policies in many countries, known as poverty reduction strategies, still do not take into account differences in income and power between men and women, hampering efforts to finance programmes that reduce inequality. In addition, she says, the majority of African women are still denied education and employment, and have limited opportunities in trade, industry and government.
African women have also successfully promoted agreements that advance their rights. By the end of last year, 51 of the 53 AU member countries had ratified CEDAW, adopted in 1979 by the UN General Assembly and often described as the international bill of rights for women. And in 2003 activists succeeded in persuading their heads of state to adopt a protocol on the rights of women. They are now lobbying states to take the final step and ratify the protocol to make it enforceable


Any advice for the African Woman?

Everybody seems to know better than an African woman, but ladies, do not let that bother you. It is because few come close enough to ever know that if they had your life, they will need ten pairs of hands to keep it  together. You are already strong, so no need saying you should be. Just believe more in yourself, and in something bigger than you. Also celebrate yourself, because each woman is a wonder of nature. And never stop celebrating all your little successes because one by one, they take you there.

1 comment:

  1. Glad to read about dynamic African women and Sisters like Pochi

    ReplyDelete